1. A Working Waterfront

Strong Maritime and Industrial Zoning Districts
The region needs space for the development of water-dependent transportation and production districts. As New York grows and as the proportion of waste that is reused and recycled also grows, the need for a working waterfront that integrates essential transportation and production functions grows as well. Without adequate services from tugs, barges, repair facilities and other maritime-support businesses, the growing shipping industry will not be able to function – a potential economic and ecological calamity.

  • Provide residential deed restrictions that recognize nearby industrial and maritime users and forestall lawsuits
  • Transfer development rights to preserve maritime businesses and safeguard future water-dependent use
  • Allow maritime easements for maritime use in perpetuity

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    An Equitable Dredging Program
    From the Hudson to the Bronx to the Passaic, the many rivers that feed our Harbor deposit millions of cubic yards of silt, sediment and clay to our water bed. The cost of removing these materials (some of it contaminated with toxic pollutants) has skyrocketed. Some capital improvement projects such as Harbor-deepening are paid for by the taxpayer and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Some small maritime businesses, parks and marinas, however, must pay for their own dredging -- and the cost is often prohibitive. Solving this problem involves finding places to put the dredged material (and preferably re-use it) and establishing a system to equitably bear the cost of removal, testing and transportation.

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